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Pink-toed Tarantula

Scientific Name: Avicularia versicolor

Did You Know?

Pink-toed tarantulas have the rather nasty habit of squirting liquid faecal matter if handled roughly. This is no doubt a defense adaptation as no predator likes to receive a face full of waste matter while trying to obtain supper!

A beautifully coloured small tarantula, particularly as juveniles when a green or turquoise iridescence is present on the head and parts of the legs. As the spider matures these colours tend to fade and adults are mostly dark brown, although colourful hues may be retained in some specimens. The tips of each leg are pale in colour, hence the common name. They are covered in dense medium length hairs which give the spider a fluffy appearance. Adults reach a maximum length of around 12cm.

Habitat:

This species is restricted to Caribbean island such as Guadeloupe and Martinique. They inhabit the tropical rainforests living up in the trees where a large silken retreat is constructed. The nest may be quite high up, even in the canopy of a mature tree. Pink-toes are fast and agile and unlike most tarantulas are particularly proficient at jumping. They are also somewhat social, or at least tolerant of others, with some specimens living in close proximity to each other.

Diet:

Frogs and geckos are commonly captured by this species, though large insects are the normal food items.

Reproduction:

After mating, female pink-toes lay around a hundred eggs, which are then wrapped in a silken ball to protect them. The mother then guards the clutch until the eggs hatch some 6-8 weeks later.

More International Spiders
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